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A South Carolina law banning sex education teachers from mentioning any relationships other than heterosexual ones — unless the talk involves sexually transmitted diseases — is fueling a climate of state-sanctioned discrimination, a federal lawsuit says.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jackie Lacey, the first black woman to lead the nation's largest local prosecutor's office, is fighting for a third term as Los Angeles County district attorney against a former police chief who says Lacey is too protective of law enforcement and puts too many people of color behind bars.

NEW YORK (AP) — About 4 in 10 American adults are obese, and nearly 1 in 10 is severely so, government researchers said Thursday.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A new coronavirus case in California could be the first in the U.S. that has no known connection to travel abroad or another known case, a possible sign the virus is spreading in a U.S.

HAGATÑA, Guam (AP) — For Antonina Palomo Cross, Japan's occupation of Guam started with terror at church. The then-7-year-old was attending Catholic services with her family when the 1941 invasion began, setting off bomb blasts, sirens and screams.

MILWAUKEE (AP) — An employee opened fire Wednesday at one of the nation's largest breweries in Milwaukee, killing five fellow workers before taking his own life, police said.

BOSTON (AP) — A utility company will pay the largest criminal fine ever imposed for breaking a federal pipeline safety law — $53 million — and plead guilty to causing a series of natural gas explosions in Massachusetts that killed one person and damaged dozens of homes, federal officials said Wednesday.

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho moved closer Wednesday to banning transgender women from competing in women's sports despite warnings that such a law is unconstitutional and uncertainties about how the NCAA might react.

NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in law enforcement grants to force states to cooperate with U.S.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — An attorney announced Wednesday his firm represents more than a dozen people in the University of Michigan sexual abuse case and will hold a news conference with the whistleblower and two other former wrestlers to share their allegations about the late Dr.

White supremacists and other far-right extremists killed at least 38 people in the U.S. in 2019, the sixth deadliest year for violence by all domestic extremists since 1970, according to a report issued Wednesday by a group that fights anti-semitism.

DENVER (AP) — Colorado is set to become the 22nd U.S. state to abolish the death penalty after lawmakers on Wednesday approved a repeal bill that Democratic Gov.

BEND, Ore. (AP) — In the early 1990s, the population of Bend was around 25,000 and leaned Republican. A lumber mill operated in the Oregon high-desert town along the banks of a scenic river.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A $13.5 billion settlement between victims of California's catastrophic wildfires and the utility blamed for causing them was supposed to bring some peace and hope to people still reeling from the devastation.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A communication satellite almost out of fuel has gotten a new life after the first space docking of its kind.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Philadelphia nonprofit group detailed plans Wednesday to open next week what would be the nation's first medically supervised injection site to combat overdose deaths, despite outrage from neighbors and opposition from the local federal prosecutor.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana man charged in his young granddaughter’s fatal fall from a cruise ship’s open window in Puerto Rico agreed to plead guilty in her July 2019 death, explaining that he was doing so “to try to help end part of this nightmare for my family.” Salvatore “Sam" Anello, who was holding Chloe Wiegand when she slipped from his grasp and fell about 150 feet to her death from an open 11th-floor window on Royal Caribbean Cruises ship, filed change of plea documents Monday in a Puerto Rico court in which he agreed to plead guilty to a negligent homicide charge in the 18-month-old's death, said the family's attorney, Michael Winkleman.

BALTIMORE (AP) — Years before taking the office she'd resign from in disgrace, Catherine Pugh had a vision to see Baltimore “prosper and grow.” In a 2005 self-published collection of poetry, the woman who would become Baltimore's mayor wrote about her solutions for the city’s challenges and dream of seeing the community unite.

Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals doled out lavish perks for top U.S. employees who hit or beat sales goals for prescription opioids and other drugs: six-figure bonuses and a chance to snag a coveted “President's Club” award, which could mean vacations to Hawaii, the Caribbean or Mexico.

A Philadelphia nonprofit group said it will open the nation's first supervised injection site next week to combat overdose deaths after a federal judge rejected Justice Department efforts to block the plan.

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal authorities raided the Manhattan headquarters of the Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard, a search that came amid claims he trafficked and sexually assaulted dozens of teenage girls and women.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — The president and CEO of one of the nation’s largest marathons has joined a chorus of former students who have complained about a late University of Michigan doctor by saying the physician performed a “completely inappropriate” act on him during a medical examination in the 1970s.

NEW YORK (AP) — A day after a jury branded Harvey Weinstein a convicted rapist, the former film producer remained at a New York City hospital on Tuesday, his new life as an inmate interrupted by concerns about high blood pressure and heart palpitations.

BOSTON (AP) — An heir to the Hot Pockets fortune was sentenced to five months in prison Tuesday for trying to cheat and bribe her daughters' way into school as part of a nationwide college admissions scam.